• The reality of prisons for many inmates is far from hoping to be rehabilitated. Instead, the reality is one of trying to protect oneself from the violence perpetrated on the inside. Read our article about the shocking reality of prison violence in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

    The reality of prisons for many inmates is far from hoping to be rehabilitated. Instead, the reality is one of trying to protect oneself from the violence perpetrated on the inside. Read our article about the shocking reality of prison violence in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

  • Some people seem to choose a life of violent crime. We ask whether it is due to an antisocial personality disorder or genes or whether other factors are at play. Read this interesting article in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

    Some people seem to choose a life of violent crime. We ask whether it is due to an antisocial personality disorder or genes or whether other factors are at play. Read this interesting article in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

  • Commercial crime is often regarded as “not so serious”. We prove the opposite in an article featured in the August 2017 issue of Servamus by giving a South African perspective to this very serious crime and the impact it has on the community and economy.

    Commercial crime is often regarded as “not so serious”. We prove the opposite in an article featured in the August 2017 issue of Servamus by giving a South African perspective to this very serious crime and the impact it has on the community and economy.

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A letter was recently circulated under the heading Applications for Bursary: SAPS Senior Management (Brigadiers to Generals): SASSETA Funded Project. The letter served to encourage those from the rank of brigadier to the rank of general to apply for bursaries for the 2017 academic year. The letter distinctly states that the Skills Development Act, 1998, places an obligation on every organisation to develop its workforce in order to improve the quality of service delivery. It states further that, in line with the Act, the South African Police Service annually sets aside bursary funds to assist employees to develop themselves.

The letter states:

“Applied qualification must be relevant to the post or in line with managerial skills (sic). The Bursary will cover the function fees for the 2017 academic year.

The Bursary grant will (be) the following:

  • Registration and examination fees.
  • Tuition fees (1st and 2nd semester) including prescribed textbooks.”

In light of the current funding crisis facing students as raised in the #FeesMustFall campaign, I find it somewhat bizarre that the Service can even consider allocating bursaries to the Senior Management Service. What makes the allocation of the bursaries most deplorable is that these senior managers have a starting salary of R879 738, peaking at R1 036 296 in the case of brigadiers. Majors-generals start at R1 061 271, peaking at R1 268 892 with lieutenant-generals commencing at R1 290 633, peaking at R1 566 264.

Non-commissioned officials’ salaries commence at R100 323 for constables peaking at R303 351 for second leg (Band B) warrant officers. What adds insult to injury is the fact that senior managers also receive fringe benefits, such as a vehicle allowance, while junior members are self-reliant on transport to and from work.

I am aware of junior members who are dedicated to improving their lot through study with the hope of one day becoming senior managers in the Service. Alas, their efforts prove to be futile when they see individuals being promoted into positions without any qualifications, save for a National Senior Certificate. Noticeably, some of those who are promoted have being propelled from clerks into senior commissioned posts way out of their depth.

Senior managers in the Service enter into five-year contracts, thus it is mind-boggling why such individuals are afforded bursaries when, upon attaining the qualification, they will not be able to use the knowledge gained in the Service or may do so for a very short period.

Senior managers should by all accounts already possess the qualifications and knowledge required to occupy the senior posts before being appointed and if they have a desire to learn further then it should be at their own cost.

To now expect senior appointees of an already bloated top structure to obtain qualifications after being appointed at the expense of those who are aspiring to reach new levels is grossly unfair. Such an exercise is fruitless and wasteful.

There are many non-commissioned officers who are striving to improve their lot through further study and who are compelled to make loans to pay for their studies. Whilst I can believe that in some instances bursary allocations have been abused, those who do so must be named and shamed and be dismissed from the Service.

The fact is that if there are financial resources for further education then such funds must be allocated to those in need and not to those who have ample means to study.

A very concerned member

[Servamus asked the Division Human Resource Development (HRD) about whether or not similar bursary schemes already exist or will in future be made available to junior members who want to study, as well as the reason why such a scheme was made available for senior management. Their feedback was as follows:

“The South African Police Service bursaries for the 2016/2017 financial year are funded from the SAPS budget and the Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority’s (SASSETA) budget.

The 70 bursaries which were funded by SASSETA were announced by Division HRD on 27 February 2017. The 558 bursaries which are funded by the SAPS budget will be announced in due course. The breakdown of these bursaries is as follows:

 

Budget

Non-Commissioned officers/Public Service officials

Officers Senior managers
SASSETA 41 9 20
SAPS 522 35 1
TOTAL 563 44 21

 

With the abovementioned bursary breakdown it is clear that only 21 (3.3%) of the 628 allocated bursaries are for senior managers. All bursaries awarded by SASSETA are regulated by SASSETA, and awarded by their board. The SAPS National Bursary Committee has no influence on the SASSETA bursary scheme.

Maj-Gen L L Gossman

Head: ETC Curriculum Development and Standards

Servamus - August 2017

Asanda Baninzi and Wox Mthuthuzeli Nombewu hijacked a sergeant based at the Langebaan Airforce Base and his girlfriend, then drove them to the Mawumawu area in Nyanga.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
Who will be the next National Commissioner of the SAPS? That is the question on many concerned South Africans' lips - especially those of police members, researchers and the SAPS's partners in the fight against crime.
By Annalise Kempen
Normal, healthy people seldom dream about death. They do not see crime scenes and dead people when they close their eyes.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
For a period of 11 years the serial rapist and murderer, Jimmy Maketta, terrorised communities in the Philippi area near Cape Town.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - August 2017

Read More - S v Parkins 2017 (1) SACR 235 (WCC)
Bradley Parkins (“the accused”) was convicted in the regional court sitting at Wynberg in the Cape Peninsula (“the trial court”) on the following six charges:
Read More - S v Mabitle 2017 (1) SACR 325 (NWM) and S v Monye and Another 2017 (1) SACR 329 (SCA)
In Ask Pollex in Servamus: August 2015, Pollex referred to a number of reported cases in respect of “contract killings”.
Read More In Servamus: June 2017, Pollex discussed the case of S v Hewitt 2017 (1) SACR 309 (SCA) (“the Hewitt case”). (The case involved the retired, world-renowned champion tennis player and instructor, Bob Hewitt.)
The Hewitt case was about three female complainants of whom two were raped and one was sexually assaulted (this offence was known as indecent assault at the time).
This month sees the last of our series of unlawful arrest and detention cases.

Letters - August 2017

Read More - An update (Servamus: December 2016
The telephone rings sharply in the charge office of Kliptown Police Station. The sergeant on duty looks up at the old clock hanging above the fireplace.
From 13 to 16 June 2017, members of the South African Police Service embarked on a trip to Mossel Bay for the Inter Provincial Soccer Championship, which was held at the D'Almeida sports ground.
Fathers’ Day was celebrated this year on 18 June, and I decided to run a special project under Social Crime Prevention for the fathers at Westville SAPS, with the wonderful support of some very gracious sponsors.
August 2017 Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.