• Despite heavy rains, the SAPS managed to host a successful national athletics championship in Pretoria at the end of March 2018. Read about the events and the winners in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 52-54.

    Despite heavy rains, the SAPS managed to host a successful national athletics championship in Pretoria at the end of March 2018. Read about the events and the winners in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 52-54.

  • Part 2 of our Crime Series discussing the shocking events of how Christopher Panayiotou had his lovely wife, Jayde, killed. Read about his conviction and sentence in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 34-43.

    Part 2 of our Crime Series discussing the shocking events of how Christopher Panayiotou had his lovely wife, Jayde, killed. Read about his conviction and sentence in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 34-43.

  • On 26 March 2018, the Western Cape Department of Community Safety and the City of Cape Town recognised the top Neighbourhood Watch structures in the Cape Town Metropole for their contribution to fight crime. Read the article in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 46-49.

    On 26 March 2018, the Western Cape Department of Community Safety and the City of Cape Town recognised the top Neighbourhood Watch structures in the Cape Town Metropole for their contribution to fight crime. Read the article in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 46-49.

  • Children should be taught about road safety from an early start – but parents have an equally important responsibility to ensure that the transport their children use to school is safe and registered. Read our articles in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 56-59.

    Children should be taught about road safety from an early start – but parents have an equally important responsibility to ensure that the transport their children use to school is safe and registered. Read our articles in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 56-59.

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- The name of the game in fighting insurance fraud with the ICB

By Annalise Kempen
Photos courtesy of the Insurance Crime Bureau (ICB)

For many consumers, short-term insurance is a grudge expense, until that day when they are involved in a vehicle accident or they return home from work or holiday to find that they have been the victim of a burglary and they need to register a claim with their insurer. But these days when we think about insurance, we should also think about how criminals are devising ways to defraud the industry.

Photo by Ihsan Haffejee/GroundUp

Compiled by Kotie Geldenhuys

There are no words to describe the shock when a man cold-bloodedly murders his wife, seemingly without motive. One such a guy was Dr Colin Bouwer, a psychiatrist from South Africa, who emigrated to New Zealand, with his wife Annette. He engaged in a succession of extramarital affairs both in New Zealand and in South Africa. One of his lovers was Anne Walsh, who worked alongside Dr Bouwer at both the university and the hospital in Otago. After attending a conference in Copenhagen together towards the end of 1999, their affair flourished. It was also the same time when Annette Bouwer, who had previously enjoyed perfect health, began feeling dizzy and unwell. The sicker Annette became, the more Anne entered the children's lives as a close family friend. Dr Bouwer in the meantime had written prescriptions for glucose-lowering drugs, grinding them up with a mortar and pestle, and giving them to Annette, most probably in her food. Annette died in January 2000, but her regular doctor refused to sign her death certificate without having a post-mortem conducted. Dr Bouwer objected to a post-mortem of his wife, but his objection was overruled. Significant levels of sedatives and insulin were found in Annette's blood and a further investigation showed they had been obtained via 11 forged prescriptions. After spinning many lies, Colin Bouwer had to face the music and was eventually sentenced in 2001 in New Zealand to life incarceration - of which he had to serve a non-parole sentence of 15 years (refer to Servamus: February 2006 for this crime story).

By Annalise Kempen

Many adults have fond memories of their grandparents - visiting them during holidays, being treated with sweets or sitting on their laps listening to numerous stories. This picture has changed in many communities where, in recent times, grandparents increasingly have been taking over the primary care responsibility of their grandchildren due to absent parents who either work in cities or have died due to the HIV pandemic. How ironic and tragic is it not that society is increasingly showing less respect for our elderly by abusing and mistreating them - especially since those are the people towards whom we often have so much to be grateful.

By Kotie Geldenhuys

When a disabled 52-year-old former soldier's wife died a couple of years ago, his 26-year-old brother-in-law moved into his house to take care of him. When the young man, let's call him John, wanted to go out, he simply locked up the former soldier, let's call him Pete, in his home, sometimes for long periods of time. In May 2016, John again went out, leaving Pete alone at home. On his return to the Coldrigde home in Vryburg, John found wheelchair-bound Pete eating his own faeces. John beat Pete with a sjambok until he died. At the time of his death, Pete had both old and new wounds as a result of being beaten over a period of time. According to neighbours, John had always hit the disabled Pete with a panga, hose pipe or sjambok because he said that he did not want Pete to dirty himself with his own faeces and drink his own urine. The matter was apparently once reported to the police but they only gave John a warning and no case was opened (Tshehle, 2016). This incident paints the grim picture of the abuse many people living with a disability face regularly.

Servamus -May 2018

“Ever since the incident, I’ve never felt the same and my life is not normal."
By Kotie Geldenhuys
Imagine sending your children to a school where the teachers are armed with pistols?
By Annalise Kempen
“Every day do something that will inch you closer to a better tomorrow.” - Doug Firebaugh.
By Annalise Kempen
Social workers found Manny in the care of a Portuguese-speaking woman who was not his mother.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - May 2018

Read More - S V DW 2017 (1) SACR 336 (NCK)
The accused, Mr DW, appeared before the magistrates’ court (apparently in the town of Kakamas, near Upington), on a charge of housebreaking with intent to commit an offence unknown to the prosecutor*.
Read More - S V MM 2018 (1) SACR 18 (GP)
Section 7 of the Child Justice Act 75 of 2008 (“the CJA”) provides as follows: “7. Minimum age of criminal capacity
Read More - NDPP v Mr PDP and Others 2017 (2) SACR 577 (NCK)
First, Pollex was told that only a person with a valid driving licence can be the owner of a motor vehicle, except when such person pays cash for the motor vehicle concerned.

Letters - May 2018

Lt-Col V G Naidoo, a retired police officer from Durban, received an honorary membership of the SAPS Athletics Association for his invaluable contribution to the sport over a number of years.
The Special Investigations Unit of the National Council of SPCAs has been strongly supported by the West Rand K9 Unit and has been assisted by some very dedicated and passionate police officials in their endeavours to bring the perpetrators of animal cruelty to justice.
Following the excellent investigation conducted by Capt Swanepoel, Adv Marius Stander, senior state advocate, wrote the following evaluation report in recognition of Capt Swanepoel's service and in order for him to be considered for an award.
May 2018 Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.