• Despite heavy rains, the SAPS managed to host a successful national athletics championship in Pretoria at the end of March 2018. Read about the events and the winners in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 52-54.

    Despite heavy rains, the SAPS managed to host a successful national athletics championship in Pretoria at the end of March 2018. Read about the events and the winners in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 52-54.

  • Part 2 of our Crime Series discussing the shocking events of how Christopher Panayiotou had his lovely wife, Jayde, killed. Read about his conviction and sentence in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 34-43.

    Part 2 of our Crime Series discussing the shocking events of how Christopher Panayiotou had his lovely wife, Jayde, killed. Read about his conviction and sentence in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 34-43.

  • On 26 March 2018, the Western Cape Department of Community Safety and the City of Cape Town recognised the top Neighbourhood Watch structures in the Cape Town Metropole for their contribution to fight crime. Read the article in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 46-49.

    On 26 March 2018, the Western Cape Department of Community Safety and the City of Cape Town recognised the top Neighbourhood Watch structures in the Cape Town Metropole for their contribution to fight crime. Read the article in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 46-49.

  • Children should be taught about road safety from an early start – but parents have an equally important responsibility to ensure that the transport their children use to school is safe and registered. Read our articles in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 56-59.

    Children should be taught about road safety from an early start – but parents have an equally important responsibility to ensure that the transport their children use to school is safe and registered. Read our articles in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 56-59.

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- The name of the game in fighting insurance fraud with the ICB

By Annalise Kempen
Photos courtesy of the Insurance Crime Bureau (ICB)

For many consumers, short-term insurance is a grudge expense, until that day when they are involved in a vehicle accident or they return home from work or holiday to find that they have been the victim of a burglary and they need to register a claim with their insurer. But these days when we think about insurance, we should also think about how criminals are devising ways to defraud the industry.

On 21 and 22 February 2018, the Insurance Crime Bureau (ICB) hosted its second conference in Midrand, entitled “Organised disruption”, looking at ways in which the insurance industry and involved parties can significantly disrupt syndicated criminal activities through common efforts and partnerships. The thought-provoking presentations by industry specialists led to many interesting discussions and questions being asked. These not only included case studies and showcasing the ingenious ways in which criminals are trying to defraud the industry (ultimately impacting on consumers). Some presenters also discussed the importance of employing staff in the industry whose integrity was beyond reproach to ensure that criminals themselves don’t infiltrate the industry.

Conference highlights
Since no conference report would ever be able to be a true reflection of everything that happened at a conference, we will therefore only point out some of the highlights during the conference.

The conference started off on a high note when Angela Mhlanga, the CEO of Hollard Partner Solutions, spoke about the importance of developing people in order to grow South Africa. She noted how unemployment has increased since 2014, and that the gross domestic product has recorded low growth rates. As a related consequence, about 30% or more than 17 million South Africans are dependent on social grants - something South Africa could no longer afford. Angela noted that people development was necessary for a large group of people to no longer depend on social grants. She also reminded the delegates that they were part of an industry which has to deal with the consequences and outcomes of our high crime rates, which could also be linked to a lack of people development. Angela noted the importance of developing our people in order to get them to be employable or become entrepreneurs. The added benefits of having people developed include that they will enjoy employment and therefore be able to pay for education; their medical bills; food and housing and that they would not have to resort to crime to provide for their basic needs. Angela gave various examples of how individuals and companies could get involved in people development, such as by teaching them new skills like basic computer literacy or how to replace car parts. Hereafter they should be given a platform from where they could repeatedly practice those new skills as interns. Angela concluded by using examples of the work done by Harambee and the Jobs Fund and those interested in getting more ideas on how to "lend a hand" could get some inspiration by visiting www.jobsfund.org.za and www.harambee.co.za

The CEO of MiWay, René Otto, gave a thought-provoking presentation about organisational ethics and how their company drove a values-based culture in various ways. One of these was by regularly awarding a (real) samurai sword to the individual staff member who set the best example of the company's values-based culture. Nominations and motivations for this award are done by peers and as a qualifying criteria, the nominations have to address all four of MiWay’s values namely freedom, attitude, energy and accountability and showcase how that employee had fulfilled them. René quoted interesting research about employees’ ethics that showed that 20% of employees have indicated that they will never steal from their company; 60% indicated that they will not steal unless they were presented with an opportunity; while 20% of employees were thinking of ways to steal from their employers all the time, ie by exaggerating travel claims. These statistics should give all employers sleepless nights.

However, these statistics do not have to be a reflection of your company if a values-based culture was entrenched and employees knew that they have to do the right thing all the time, and also knew what the right thing was. René said that MiWay has adopted a zero tolerance attitude towards non-compliance with their values-based culture, especially regarding dishonesty and a lack of accountability. The reasons were simple: if employees were dishonest, it led to a lack of trust; a lack of trust led to a permanent breakdown of employer-employee relationships and ultimately necessitates that a bad apple needs to be removed before s/he contaminated the rest of the box. Ultimately, it is not important what an employee tells you about him-/herself during an interview, but how they behave - do their words and behaviour match?

Getting technical
On a technical level, David Hartley from the SAS Institute explained during his presentation how technology is used to identify, track and combat syndicated crime. That was done after he had sketched a background of the extent of insurance fraud in different parts of the world. For example, in Britain it was estimated that undetected fraud costs insurers £3 billion (R48 billion) a year; in Switzerland it is estimated that 10% of claims are fraudulent; the United States estimates losses of as much as $80 billion per year due to insurance fraud; while a survey conducted in Finland in 2014 showed that 19% of respondents said that they knew a person “who has deceived his/her insurance company”. The question is how do insurance companies detect and prevent potential fraud? From David’s presentation it was clear that analytical software can play a vital role in detecting fraud and that data can be used to find unexplained anomalies. David noted that such analytical software allows for swifter decisions in terms of further investigations and ultimately in more efficient investigations. In Turkey for example, using analytical software has resulted in a 66% increase in fraud detection. It therefore makes sense that insurance companies use these types of tools to detect and prevent fraud.

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[This is only an extract of an article published in Servamus: April 2018. The rest of the notes other conference speakers’ presentations and reminds who the Insurance Crime Bureau is. To enquire how to obtain the rest of the article, contact Servamus’s offices at tel: (012) 345 4660/22 or send an e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.]

Servamus -May 2018

“Ever since the incident, I’ve never felt the same and my life is not normal."
By Kotie Geldenhuys
Imagine sending your children to a school where the teachers are armed with pistols?
By Annalise Kempen
“Every day do something that will inch you closer to a better tomorrow.” - Doug Firebaugh.
By Annalise Kempen
Social workers found Manny in the care of a Portuguese-speaking woman who was not his mother.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - May 2018

Read More - S V DW 2017 (1) SACR 336 (NCK)
The accused, Mr DW, appeared before the magistrates’ court (apparently in the town of Kakamas, near Upington), on a charge of housebreaking with intent to commit an offence unknown to the prosecutor*.
Read More - S V MM 2018 (1) SACR 18 (GP)
Section 7 of the Child Justice Act 75 of 2008 (“the CJA”) provides as follows: “7. Minimum age of criminal capacity
Read More - NDPP v Mr PDP and Others 2017 (2) SACR 577 (NCK)
First, Pollex was told that only a person with a valid driving licence can be the owner of a motor vehicle, except when such person pays cash for the motor vehicle concerned.

Letters - May 2018

Lt-Col V G Naidoo, a retired police officer from Durban, received an honorary membership of the SAPS Athletics Association for his invaluable contribution to the sport over a number of years.
The Special Investigations Unit of the National Council of SPCAs has been strongly supported by the West Rand K9 Unit and has been assisted by some very dedicated and passionate police officials in their endeavours to bring the perpetrators of animal cruelty to justice.
Following the excellent investigation conducted by Capt Swanepoel, Adv Marius Stander, senior state advocate, wrote the following evaluation report in recognition of Capt Swanepoel's service and in order for him to be considered for an award.
May 2018 Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.