• The SAPS held a special parade to welcome back Mr Bheki Cele as the Minister for Police. He had previously been the National Commissioner of the SAPS. Refer to article published on pp 44-45 of Servamus: April 2018.

    The SAPS held a special parade to welcome back Mr Bheki Cele as the Minister for Police. He had previously been the National Commissioner of the SAPS. Refer to article published on pp 44-45 of Servamus: April 2018.

  • The tragedy surrounding the murder of Jayde Panayiotou is discussed in this month’s crime series. Read about how Jayde’s murder was planned by her husband and the work done by the police investigators.

    The tragedy surrounding the murder of Jayde Panayiotou is discussed in this month’s crime series. Read about how Jayde’s murder was planned by her husband and the work done by the police investigators.

  • Following the Marikana tragedy in 2012, the Public Order Policing Units of the SAPS come under attack. A lot of work has been done ever since, including the launch of national reserve POP Units. We update you on the latest developments surrounding POP in Servamus: April 2018.

    Following the Marikana tragedy in 2012, the Public Order Policing Units of the SAPS come under attack. A lot of work has been done ever since, including the launch of national reserve POP Units. We update you on the latest developments surrounding POP in Servamus: April 2018.

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- The name of the game in fighting insurance fraud with the ICB

By Annalise Kempen
Photos courtesy of the Insurance Crime Bureau (ICB)

For many consumers, short-term insurance is a grudge expense, until that day when they are involved in a vehicle accident or they return home from work or holiday to find that they have been the victim of a burglary and they need to register a claim with their insurer. But these days when we think about insurance, we should also think about how criminals are devising ways to defraud the industry.

On 21 and 22 February 2018, the Insurance Crime Bureau (ICB) hosted its second conference in Midrand, entitled “Organised disruption”, looking at ways in which the insurance industry and involved parties can significantly disrupt syndicated criminal activities through common efforts and partnerships. The thought-provoking presentations by industry specialists led to many interesting discussions and questions being asked. These not only included case studies and showcasing the ingenious ways in which criminals are trying to defraud the industry (ultimately impacting on consumers). Some presenters also discussed the importance of employing staff in the industry whose integrity was beyond reproach to ensure that criminals themselves don’t infiltrate the industry.

Conference highlights
Since no conference report would ever be able to be a true reflection of everything that happened at a conference, we will therefore only point out some of the highlights during the conference.

The conference started off on a high note when Angela Mhlanga, the CEO of Hollard Partner Solutions, spoke about the importance of developing people in order to grow South Africa. She noted how unemployment has increased since 2014, and that the gross domestic product has recorded low growth rates. As a related consequence, about 30% or more than 17 million South Africans are dependent on social grants - something South Africa could no longer afford. Angela noted that people development was necessary for a large group of people to no longer depend on social grants. She also reminded the delegates that they were part of an industry which has to deal with the consequences and outcomes of our high crime rates, which could also be linked to a lack of people development. Angela noted the importance of developing our people in order to get them to be employable or become entrepreneurs. The added benefits of having people developed include that they will enjoy employment and therefore be able to pay for education; their medical bills; food and housing and that they would not have to resort to crime to provide for their basic needs. Angela gave various examples of how individuals and companies could get involved in people development, such as by teaching them new skills like basic computer literacy or how to replace car parts. Hereafter they should be given a platform from where they could repeatedly practice those new skills as interns. Angela concluded by using examples of the work done by Harambee and the Jobs Fund and those interested in getting more ideas on how to "lend a hand" could get some inspiration by visiting www.jobsfund.org.za and www.harambee.co.za

The CEO of MiWay, René Otto, gave a thought-provoking presentation about organisational ethics and how their company drove a values-based culture in various ways. One of these was by regularly awarding a (real) samurai sword to the individual staff member who set the best example of the company's values-based culture. Nominations and motivations for this award are done by peers and as a qualifying criteria, the nominations have to address all four of MiWay’s values namely freedom, attitude, energy and accountability and showcase how that employee had fulfilled them. René quoted interesting research about employees’ ethics that showed that 20% of employees have indicated that they will never steal from their company; 60% indicated that they will not steal unless they were presented with an opportunity; while 20% of employees were thinking of ways to steal from their employers all the time, ie by exaggerating travel claims. These statistics should give all employers sleepless nights.

However, these statistics do not have to be a reflection of your company if a values-based culture was entrenched and employees knew that they have to do the right thing all the time, and also knew what the right thing was. René said that MiWay has adopted a zero tolerance attitude towards non-compliance with their values-based culture, especially regarding dishonesty and a lack of accountability. The reasons were simple: if employees were dishonest, it led to a lack of trust; a lack of trust led to a permanent breakdown of employer-employee relationships and ultimately necessitates that a bad apple needs to be removed before s/he contaminated the rest of the box. Ultimately, it is not important what an employee tells you about him-/herself during an interview, but how they behave - do their words and behaviour match?

Getting technical
On a technical level, David Hartley from the SAS Institute explained during his presentation how technology is used to identify, track and combat syndicated crime. That was done after he had sketched a background of the extent of insurance fraud in different parts of the world. For example, in Britain it was estimated that undetected fraud costs insurers £3 billion (R48 billion) a year; in Switzerland it is estimated that 10% of claims are fraudulent; the United States estimates losses of as much as $80 billion per year due to insurance fraud; while a survey conducted in Finland in 2014 showed that 19% of respondents said that they knew a person “who has deceived his/her insurance company”. The question is how do insurance companies detect and prevent potential fraud? From David’s presentation it was clear that analytical software can play a vital role in detecting fraud and that data can be used to find unexplained anomalies. David noted that such analytical software allows for swifter decisions in terms of further investigations and ultimately in more efficient investigations. In Turkey for example, using analytical software has resulted in a 66% increase in fraud detection. It therefore makes sense that insurance companies use these types of tools to detect and prevent fraud.

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[This is only an extract of an article published in Servamus: April 2018. The rest of the notes other conference speakers’ presentations and reminds who the Insurance Crime Bureau is. To enquire how to obtain the rest of the article, contact Servamus’s offices at tel: (012) 345 4660/22 or send an e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.]

Servamus - April 2018

When a disabled 52-year-old former soldier's wife died a couple of years ago, his 26-year-old brother-in-law moved into his house to take care of him.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
For many consumers, short-term insurance is a grudge expense, until that day when they are involved in a vehicle accident or they return home from work or holiday to find that they have been the victim of a burglary and they need to register a claim with their insurer.
By Annalise Kempen
There are no words to describe the shock when a man cold-bloodedly murders his wife, seemingly without motive.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
Many adults have fond memories of their grandparents - visiting them during holidays, being treated with sweets or sitting on their laps listening to numerous stories.
By Annalise Kempen

Pollex - April 2018

The word supra refers to "a person who eats human flesh". According to recent media reports, arrests have been made "for the crime of cannibalism" (Afrikaans: "kannibalisme") and that those persons will "appear in court on charges of cannibalism".
Read More - Per Mr Lucky Shange in a news item that appeared in News 24 dated 17 February 2018
According to the news item referred to supra, the 40-year-old Mr Lucky Shange was arrested in 1998.
According to all indications, South Africa has, or is heading for a water crisis. As far as the Cape Peninsula in the Western Cape is concerned, the crisis is already upon its inhabitants.

Letters - April 2018

The article “A walk down memory lane - Paying tribute to a dedicated war hero” that was published in Servamus: March 2018 on pp 76-77, refers.
Ever thought about the impact of parents’ jobs on their children? This poem, written by W/O Johan Coetzer’s daughter, Megan, says so much, especially when one realises that she was only 13 years old when she wrote it.
April 2018 Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.