• Have you ever taught about your car’s safety when you are involved in a vehicle crash? Will you and your loved ones be protected in as far as it is possible? Refer to the article published on pp 14 -16 in Servamus: January 2020 to determine the NCAP safety rating of many cars on SA’s roads.

    Have you ever taught about your car’s safety when you are involved in a vehicle crash? Will you and your loved ones be protected in as far as it is possible? Refer to the article published on pp 14 -16 in Servamus: January 2020 to determine the NCAP safety rating of many cars on SA’s roads.

  • We all have a responsibility to create a safer world for our children – that includes on our roads. Sadly, vehicle crashes are some of the leading causes for child deaths. Walk This Way is a ChildSafe intervention project that aims to address child pedestrian safety – refer to the article in Servamus: January 2020 on pp 34-35 giving more details.

    We all have a responsibility to create a safer world for our children – that includes on our roads. Sadly, vehicle crashes are some of the leading causes for child deaths. Walk This Way is a ChildSafe intervention project that aims to address child pedestrian safety – refer to the article in Servamus: January 2020 on pp 34-35 giving more details.

  • Many people opt to go on a boat cruise for a holiday. Yet, there are many aspects that can affect the passengers and crew’s safety necessitating such cruise liners to have adequately trained security personnel. Refer to the article in Servamus: January 2020 on pp 30-32 about what is done to mitigate treats to such cruise liners.

    Many people opt to go on a boat cruise for a holiday. Yet, there are many aspects that can affect the passengers and crew’s safety necessitating such cruise liners to have adequately trained security personnel. Refer to the article in Servamus: January 2020 on pp 30-32 about what is done to mitigate treats to such cruise liners.

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By Kotie Geldenhuys
Photos by GroundUp

Corruption is a global problem that knows no boundaries. It is a crime which is invariably committed in secrecy between willing participants, with few, if any witnesses. The result is that the crime is often only noticed when it is in an advanced stage and dealing with it becomes a huge challenge. The recent achievements of the Hawks in investigating corruption confirm that they are ready for the challenges related to investigating this crime - irrespective of how serious it is.

The Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI), also known as the Hawks, was established in 2009 as an independent directorate within the South African Police Service in terms of section 17C of the South African Police Service Act 68 of 1995 as amended by the South African Police Service Amendment Act 57 of 2008. The mandate of the DPCI is essentially to prevent, combat and investigate national priority offences, focusing on serious organised crime, serious commercial crime and serious corruption.

The appointment of Lt-Gen Godfrey Lebeya as the head of the DPCI in May 2018, was widely welcomed as it inspired hope that the Hawks would improve their performance in addressing corruption as well as other serious organised and commercial crime. In view of the large number of media statements that have been issued by the DPCI in recent months relating to arrests and convictions in corruption cases we visited Lt-Gen Godfrey Lebeya to get more insight into dealing with this menace.

As the national head of the DPCI, Lt-Gen Lebeya is proud of his team and their achievements, but he quickly added that participative management is important to him as it encourages the involvement of employees at all levels in the analysis of problems, development of strategies and implementation of solutions. Team work is as important, as one must always check with others what their views are on specific aspects. One often tends to think your own view is best, but once others are involved, they will bring other ideas to the table which will actually improve your own ideas. “I like it that when we discuss something, others must also come with ideas, they must not just agree. If we have a meeting where everybody agrees, we can make a lot of mistakes,” said Lt-Gen Lebeya. He said that he must ensure that when he is not around, those who remain will still be able to carry on the fight against serious crime. “What I have in my advantage is my experience, but my colleagues also have specific knowledge and with their knowledge they can enhance the idea I have, so that it becomes our idea. When I leave, I must leave the legacy so that people know what they are supposed to be doing and carry on and even improve on what was happening instead of starting from scratch,” he said.

More manpower for the Hawks
The Hawks currently comprise approximately 2500 members which is a much smaller staff complement than when they were established in 2009. Research conducted by the SAPS confirmed that the Hawks's capacity must increase to 5300 to assist the Hawks in covering the whole country. According to Lt-Gen Lebeya, the lack of capacity makes it difficult to respond to crimes such as a cash-in-transit heists, in a rural area far from where the Hawks have an office and resources. "We have expanded our presence in these areas by setting up some satellite offices so that we can reach certain areas much faster," Lt-Gen Lebeya said. However, he reminded us that satellite offices are not units but only a place from where they can depart to reach certain areas.

Lt-Gen Lebeya informed us that in an attempt to reach their target numbers, the Hawks will:

  • Do recruitment from the SAPS detectives. This will be done with the understanding that the detectives will then do recruitment from the visible policing environment. The Hawks however require more experienced detectives who will be able to deal with more complicated cases and investigations;
  • recruit external people with scarce skills such as chartered accountants;
  • look at the re-enlistment of detectives who have the skills required by the Hawks; and
  • target graduates with certain qualifications which can benefit the Hawks such as BCom graduates and those with legal qualifications who are interested in becoming investigation officers.

Investigating corruption
The Hawks investigate serious corruption and high-profile cases involving private companies and government departments. They investigate more complicated cases involving larger amounts of money or when those involved need to be addressed at a higher level. Lt-Gen Lebeya explained that some corruption cases such as when a police official is accused of taking a bribe can be investigated by the detectives. Some cases might start small, but as detectives proceed with their investigations, they might find a bigger network and request the Hawks’s help with the investigation. In such cases the Hawks might step in, but sometimes they will leave it with the general detectives to investigate.

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[This is only an extract of an article published in Servamus: December 2019. If you are interested in reading the rest of the article which discusses serious corruption investigations; the establishment of task teams; dealing with their own and successes achieved by the Serious Corruption Investigation Component, please contact Servamus’s offices at tel: (012) 345 4660/22 or send an e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to find out how.]

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Servamus - January 2020

It is just after 05:00 in a cold, windy and rainy Cape Town when the packed train pulls onto platform three.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
One of the very sad consequences of every holiday season is the high number of vehicle crashes happening on our roads - not only resulting in people losing loved ones, but also leaving many drivers and passengers seriously injured or even disabled.
By Annalise Kempen
A lot is being said and written about vehicle fitness and road-worthiness, but what about your own fitness to drive a vehicle?
By Annalise Kempen
In South Africa, fatalities due to vehicle crashes are a major contributor to unnatural deaths impacting negatively on our economic development and growth.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - January 2020

Read More - S V Nkosinathi Gama Review No: R40/2019 dated 19 July 2019 (FB)*; S V Bam 2019(2) SACR 662 (FB)*; and S V Phuzi 2019(2) SACR 648 (FB)*
Section 59 of the National Road Traffic Act 93 of 1996 (“the NRTA”) provides as follows:
Read More – Moyo and Another V Minister of Police and Others; Sonti and Another V Minister of Police and Others (CCT 174/18; CCT 178/18) [2019] ZACC 40 (22 October 2019) (CC)
Introduction Certain provisions of the Intimidation Act 72 of 1982 were recently referred to our Constitutional Court (“the Concourt”) in order to challenge their constitutionality.

Letters - January 2020

We salute Brig Mauritz "Happy" Schutte who was born on 4 September 1951, but was called for higher duties to be with his Lord and Saviour, our God Almighty on 9 October 2019, succumbing to the illness of cancer.
There is talk of forcing pension onto members at the age of 55, with no talk of any adjustments for the Public Service Act employees who can still build pension up to the age of 65.
January Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.