• We are increasingly paying more attention to the damaging impact that environmental crime has on the environment and ecosystems, peace, security and development. Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 10 – 13.

    We are increasingly paying more attention to the damaging impact that environmental crime has on the environment and ecosystems, peace, security and development. Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 10 – 13.

  • Ever thought about the security risks associated with the illegal dumping of medical waste on dump sites in South Africa? We tell you more about prosecution and minimising the risk of cross-contamination. Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 34-35.

    Ever thought about the security risks associated with the illegal dumping of medical waste on dump sites in South Africa? We tell you more about prosecution and minimising the risk of cross-contamination. Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 34-35.

  • Did you know that there was a link between pollution and crime? We didn’t, until we researched the topic and found that exposure to toxic substances (including lead) was higher among violent criminals. Interesting! Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 31 – 33.

    Did you know that there was a link between pollution and crime? We didn’t, until we researched the topic and found that exposure to toxic substances (including lead) was higher among violent criminals. Interesting! Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 31 – 33.

  • Following a spate of criminal incidents around the OR Tambo International Airport, the Minister of Police unveiled the integrated multi-disciplinary tactical security plan for this national key point. Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 50-51.

    Following a spate of criminal incidents around the OR Tambo International Airport, the Minister of Police unveiled the integrated multi-disciplinary tactical security plan for this national key point. Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 50-51.

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By Annalise Kempen

Some call it a new form of Apartheid ... some call it an excuse for criminality. Given the massive migration seen in the past decade throughout the world, and despite xenophobia not being unique to South Africa, it seems that it is a phenomenon that is extremely hard to tackle and get viable solutions for. It is a phenomenon where the dislike of or prejudice against people from other countries seems to increase with time.

It seems that every year or so, South Africa experiences an outbreak of xenophobia. Why it happens, often out of the blue, is a difficult question to answer. One of the latest incidents happened towards the end of February 2017, when scores of seemingly foreign-owned shops in Atteridgeville and Lotus Gardens were damaged and looted. Chances that every single one of the affected shops was being owned by foreigners, are highly unlikely.

By Kotie Geldenhuys
All stock photos are posed

Something is very wrong in South Africa. Why are we experiencing so much violence? Our court rolls are shocking - with accused standing trial for the rape and murder of children; youngsters standing trial for murdering their parents; men being accused for murdering their wives; and armed robberies turning to murder - the list is never ending.

While the majority of South Africans are law-abiding citizens, many South Africans have little respect for the law. The general attitude of South Africans towards the law is demonstrated by the large number of people who are driving without wearing seat belts; driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol; using their cellphones while driving or ignoring red traffic lights. And to add fuel to fire, people in positions of authority who abuse their power and blatantly ignore the law set no example for others to encourage respect for the law. Gould (2014) argues that, as long as those holding political office appear to act with impunity, or cynically manipulate the criminal justice system to dodge very serious allegations of the abuse of power and state resources, we cannot reasonably expect other South African citizens to respect the law.

By Kotie Geldenhuys

It is early in the morning and the residents of a small town wake up to the smell of smoke and the chanting of protesters. Upon trying to go to work, residents find their roads barricaded, shops looted and a school almost burnt down. Smoke fills the air and flashing blue lights indicate that the police are at hand to keep a close eye on the protesters and, if necessary, to keep them under control with water cannons and tear smoke. Some residents join the protest march, others simply turn around and phone the office to tell them they can’t get to work.

Protest actions have formed part of the South African landscape for many years, and are, in essence, not bad since they give people an opportunity to express their problems and concerns. Mass demonstrations act as a potent weapon in the hands of people who, as individuals, have little power and are seldom listened to by those in power. It is exactly because such protests cause inconvenience and disruption and sometimes limit the rights of others, that they are noticed and may have an impact.

By Kotie Geldenhuys

It is a big concern that a large number of violent protests undermine the SAPS's crime prevention efforts. When protestors block roads and damage property, the police need to divert their resources away from other responsibilities and activities in order to disperse protestors.

The police are often criticised for their role in violent protests. They were almost solely blamed for what went wrong at Marikana in August 2012, where police shot and killed 34 striking miners and wounded 76 others, after two of their own were hacked to death. By the end of 2015, South Africa saw protests on university campuses which involved widespread disruption of teaching programmes by these protestors (Bruce, 2016b). This time, the police were blamed for responding too quickly.

Servamus - September 2017

In June 2017, two Chinese nationals were removed from an Istanbul-bound plane just before take-off at OR Tambo International Airport in Gauteng.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
Elephants are hunted for their ivory and rhinos for their horns. Pangolins, lions and leopards are killed for the muti trade.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
It is a hot, peaceful summer's day in Africa. A herd of elephants is peacefully feeding on small bushes and trees on one of the plains while the persistent and deafening drone of the cicadas pulses through the air.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
When we throw something into the garbage bin, we seldom think about its destination. All the discarded plastic bags, broken cellphones and televisions, used batteries and bulbs, glass bottles and old stoves contribute in some way to environmental pollution.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - September 2017

Read More - Director of Public Prosecutions, Western Cape v Parker 2015 (2) SACR 109 (SCA)
Step-in-Time Supermarket CC*, a registered Value-Added Tax (VAT) vendor (Afrikaans: “ondernemer”), and Mr Parker, its sole representative, were charged in the regional court in Bellville in the Cape Peninsula on a number of counts under the Income Tax Act 58 of 1962 and the Value-Added Tax Act 89 of 1991 (the VAT Act) respectively.
Read More - S V Mandlozi 2015 (2) SACR 258 (FB)
Ms Lindiwe Mandlozi, also known as Leopoldina Maconze (hereinafter referred to as the accused), was convicted before the regional court in Kroonstad in the Free State (the trial court) of contravention of section 5(b) of the Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act 140 of 1992, read together with certain specified provisions thereof.
Read More - S V Mukuyu 2017 (2) SACR 27 (GJ)
Section 51(2)(a)(i) of the Criminal Law Amendment Act 105 of 1997 (“Act 105 of 1997”) provides as follows: “51. Discretionary minimum sentences for certain serious offences
In a publication unrelated to Servamus, Pollex recently remarked as follows as far as Act 60 of 2000 is concerned:

Letters - September 2017

Two former police officers, viz Capt Saravanan Govender and Raju Ellapen, were honoured, appreciated and recognised for the enormous contributions and life-changing experiences they imparted into the lives of thousands of Indian policemen and -women at both the Wentworth and Chatsworth Indian Police Colleges.
The SAPS does not always get a good rap so I would like to commend your members on the dealings we had with them.
The National Council of SPCAs (NSPCA) would like to express our gratitude to members of Ladysmith and QwaQwa SAPS for their assistance with a donkey case recently handled by the NSPCA.
On Saturday 15 July 2017, at around 19:00, I was off duty and took my family to pick up a few things from a café in Swartruggens near the N4, using my private vehicle.
I’m extremely thankful to W/O Van Graan and his two colleagues, W/O Bothma and Sgt Manus from K9 Breede River Worcester, for “saving my life” following an incident on 4 July 2017.
September 2017 Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.