• Despite heavy rains, the SAPS managed to host a successful national athletics championship in Pretoria at the end of March 2018. Read about the events and the winners in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 52-54.

    Despite heavy rains, the SAPS managed to host a successful national athletics championship in Pretoria at the end of March 2018. Read about the events and the winners in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 52-54.

  • Part 2 of our Crime Series discussing the shocking events of how Christopher Panayiotou had his lovely wife, Jayde, killed. Read about his conviction and sentence in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 34-43.

    Part 2 of our Crime Series discussing the shocking events of how Christopher Panayiotou had his lovely wife, Jayde, killed. Read about his conviction and sentence in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 34-43.

  • On 26 March 2018, the Western Cape Department of Community Safety and the City of Cape Town recognised the top Neighbourhood Watch structures in the Cape Town Metropole for their contribution to fight crime. Read the article in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 46-49.

    On 26 March 2018, the Western Cape Department of Community Safety and the City of Cape Town recognised the top Neighbourhood Watch structures in the Cape Town Metropole for their contribution to fight crime. Read the article in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 46-49.

  • Children should be taught about road safety from an early start – but parents have an equally important responsibility to ensure that the transport their children use to school is safe and registered. Read our articles in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 56-59.

    Children should be taught about road safety from an early start – but parents have an equally important responsibility to ensure that the transport their children use to school is safe and registered. Read our articles in Servamus: May 2018 from pp 56-59.

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By Kotie Geldenhuys

We often stand amazed at what can be found on the Internet and it is no surprise that the Internet is used as a tool to commit crime. Technology gives traditional forms of crime, especially organised crime, a new dimension. Money laundering, drug sales, distribution of child abuse material and prostitution have evolved as a result of technological developments. The Internet also offers human traffickers unprecedented opportunities, which they have been quick to exploit. They have found new ways of marketing and delivering women and children into appalling conditions of sexual exploitation and modern day slavery.

While the rapid diffusion of digital technology has provided significant benefits to society, it also created new channels and opportunities for exploitation. Latonero et al (2012) argue that the business of human trafficking is increasingly occurring online and via cellphones. The rise of mobile technology has fundamentally transformed the landscape of human trafficking. Its ability to facilitate real-time communication and coordination, unbound by physical location, is exploited by traffickers to extend the reach of their illicit activities. Traffickers are able to recruit, advertise, organise and communicate primarily, or even exclusively, via cellphone, effectively streamlining their activities and expanding their criminal networks. However, the same technologies that are being used for trafficking can become a powerful tool to combat trafficking.

What is technology-facilitated trafficking?
Latonero et al (2012) explain that technology-facilitated trafficking refers to the social and technical ecosystem wherein individuals use information and communication technologies to engage in human trafficking and related behaviour. Digital and network technologies impact visibility, coordination, transaction, exchange and organisation. These technologies can therefore impact various aspects of trafficking, from grooming, recruitment and control of victims to advertising, movement and financial transactions. An understanding of how technology is facilitating human trafficking is a crucial component for counter-trafficking efforts in the 21st century.

Using the Internet as a tool to recruit victims
In the past, printed advertisements for employment, marriage, dating, etc were a well-known way of recruiting victims. These days, with the expansion of new technologies, these advertisements have also moved to the Internet. Potential victims no longer need to buy newspapers, while traffickers no longer have to pay for advertising space in the media.

Sykiotou (2007) explains that criminals use the Internet in exactly the same way as legal businesses, with the aim to advertise and to attract clients. The Internet is a commercial tool which is used to promote and sell products and services of all kinds. Traffickers lure victims with promising advertisements for jobs on general advertisement sites, through au pair agencies, international marriage agencies or dating sites. In addition to adverts, traffickers also directly approach victims in chat rooms or on mainstream social media (Europol, 2014). Internet chat sites are often used to "befriend" potential victims and for younger people, the danger of falling into the traffickers' clutches has substantially increased.

For the past decade, human trafficking facilitated through the Internet has gained momentum. In 2008, the UNODC already mentioned that in Denmark, law enforcement authorities noted suspicious advertisements for nannies, waitresses and dancers on websites in Latvia and Lithuania. The traffickers used Internet sites to post advertisements for jobs in Western Europe. An anti-trafficking group in Poland reports that 30% of its clients (trafficked women) were recruited through the Internet (UNODC, 2008). Latonero et al (2012) also refer to 140 closed trafficking cases from across the USA which were examined. Of these cases, 85% were sex trafficking cases and in 27% of cases, perpetrators used the Internet as a trafficking tool.

Dixon (2013) argues that some trafficking cases start with the offender contacting the potential victims on social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace. The offender gains the potential victim's trust by expressing love and admiration for the victim, promising to make the victim a star and providing a ticket to a new location away from the victim's home. In July 2017, a 24-year-old woman from the Free State returned safely to South Africa after she had fallen victim to human trafficking.

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[This is only an extract of an article published in Servamus: March 2018. The rest of the article look at the role of marriage agencies; when promises of a good job turn out to be sex work; how some victims are trafficked into slavery to do slave-like jobs and the fight against online slavery/human trafficking. To enquire how to obtain the rest of the article, contact Servamus’s offices at tel: (012) 345 4660 or send an e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Servamus -May 2018

“Ever since the incident, I’ve never felt the same and my life is not normal."
By Kotie Geldenhuys
Imagine sending your children to a school where the teachers are armed with pistols?
By Annalise Kempen
“Every day do something that will inch you closer to a better tomorrow.” - Doug Firebaugh.
By Annalise Kempen
Social workers found Manny in the care of a Portuguese-speaking woman who was not his mother.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - May 2018

Read More - S V DW 2017 (1) SACR 336 (NCK)
The accused, Mr DW, appeared before the magistrates’ court (apparently in the town of Kakamas, near Upington), on a charge of housebreaking with intent to commit an offence unknown to the prosecutor*.
Read More - S V MM 2018 (1) SACR 18 (GP)
Section 7 of the Child Justice Act 75 of 2008 (“the CJA”) provides as follows: “7. Minimum age of criminal capacity
Read More - NDPP v Mr PDP and Others 2017 (2) SACR 577 (NCK)
First, Pollex was told that only a person with a valid driving licence can be the owner of a motor vehicle, except when such person pays cash for the motor vehicle concerned.

Letters - May 2018

Lt-Col V G Naidoo, a retired police officer from Durban, received an honorary membership of the SAPS Athletics Association for his invaluable contribution to the sport over a number of years.
The Special Investigations Unit of the National Council of SPCAs has been strongly supported by the West Rand K9 Unit and has been assisted by some very dedicated and passionate police officials in their endeavours to bring the perpetrators of animal cruelty to justice.
Following the excellent investigation conducted by Capt Swanepoel, Adv Marius Stander, senior state advocate, wrote the following evaluation report in recognition of Capt Swanepoel's service and in order for him to be considered for an award.
May 2018 Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.