• We are increasingly paying more attention to the damaging impact that environmental crime has on the environment and ecosystems, peace, security and development. Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 10 – 13.

    We are increasingly paying more attention to the damaging impact that environmental crime has on the environment and ecosystems, peace, security and development. Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 10 – 13.

  • Ever thought about the security risks associated with the illegal dumping of medical waste on dump sites in South Africa? We tell you more about prosecution and minimising the risk of cross-contamination. Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 34-35.

    Ever thought about the security risks associated with the illegal dumping of medical waste on dump sites in South Africa? We tell you more about prosecution and minimising the risk of cross-contamination. Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 34-35.

  • Did you know that there was a link between pollution and crime? We didn’t, until we researched the topic and found that exposure to toxic substances (including lead) was higher among violent criminals. Interesting! Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 31 – 33.

    Did you know that there was a link between pollution and crime? We didn’t, until we researched the topic and found that exposure to toxic substances (including lead) was higher among violent criminals. Interesting! Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 31 – 33.

  • Following a spate of criminal incidents around the OR Tambo International Airport, the Minister of Police unveiled the integrated multi-disciplinary tactical security plan for this national key point. Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 50-51.

    Following a spate of criminal incidents around the OR Tambo International Airport, the Minister of Police unveiled the integrated multi-disciplinary tactical security plan for this national key point. Read the article in Servamus: September 2017 from pp 50-51.

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Compiled by Kotie Geldenhuys

In April 2013, a 17-year-old girl named Rehtaeh Parsons, was removed from life support and subsequently died. This happened three days after her mother discovered her daughter hanging in the bathroom of their home in Nova Scotia, Canada. The girl had apparently gotten drunk at a party in 2011 and was gang-raped by four boys, who took a picture of the scene and posted it online. Rehtaeh was mercilessly bullied by classmates for two years after the incident and even after the family moved to a new town to get her away from the abuse, the bullying continued. In August 2013, Canadian authorities charged two 18-year-old boys with distributing child pornography. In November 2014, the first accused was sentenced to a conditional discharge with 12 months' probation, which means that his criminal record will not show a conviction in this case unless he breaches the terms of his probation. In January 2015, the second accused, who had texted a photo that showed him penetrating the victim and flashing a thumbs up while she vomited, was sentenced to 12 months' probation.

- A form of digital sexual harassment?
Compiled by Kotie Geldenhuys

"Can you crawl through my window? I will do whatever you want. I want it to be first-class. First-class hotel, champagne and good sex." These words appeared in a text message sent from the 51-year-old Martin Careen, a teacher at a private Catholic school, to one of his 17-year-old female learners in 2009. More sexually explicit messages followed over a two-day period. Fortunately for this teenager, it had to stop since, in 2012, Martin Careen was sentenced to 60 days' incarceration. He was also no longer permitted to teach (Hopes, 2012). This incident makes one wonder how often teachers, whom we trust with our children, are guilty of this form of abuse.

In the digital age in which we are living, teachers must continually keep up with the latest advances introduced to them by their learners. These advances often pose new challenges in classroom management and learner discipline. Sadly, some teachers misuse developments in technology and get involved in things such as sexting.

By Kotie Geldenhuys

It is night-time in the city. Flashing neon lights and soft streetlamps create shadowy images across the pavement. Cars stop at traffic lights and impatient motorists sound their car hooters. But on the street corners, another picture is unfolding as the ladies of the night are waiting for their first pickup of the night, dressed to attract attention in their high heels and short skirts. Close by, dressed in tight-fitting jeans, a few young men are also strolling about the intersection, waiting for johns who would pay them for sexual favours. ("Johns" is a slang term used to refer to the male customers of a sex worker.) They are the men of the night. A white Mercedes emerges from a nearby alley, flashing its lights and making one of the young men smile before he gets in the car.

Compiled by Kotie Geldenhuys

In May 2017, the story broke that a young 22-year-old water polo teacher at Parktown Boys High had been accused of sexually grooming and assaulting more than 20 schoolboys, aged between 15 and 16 years, at this top school in Johannesburg. Sadly, this is not an isolated incident but is rather one of the many examples of what has been happening across all sectors of the world - it happens when those in so-called positions of power abuse these positions of trust, which they could have used to make a positive difference to other people's lives instead.

Power, in itself, is not necessarily a bad thing. But when power is combined with abuse, the problems start. Many of those who are in positions of power, such as teachers, priests, employers, politicians and coaches, abuse the power that their positions give them.

Servamus - September 2017

In June 2017, two Chinese nationals were removed from an Istanbul-bound plane just before take-off at OR Tambo International Airport in Gauteng.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
Elephants are hunted for their ivory and rhinos for their horns. Pangolins, lions and leopards are killed for the muti trade.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
It is a hot, peaceful summer's day in Africa. A herd of elephants is peacefully feeding on small bushes and trees on one of the plains while the persistent and deafening drone of the cicadas pulses through the air.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
When we throw something into the garbage bin, we seldom think about its destination. All the discarded plastic bags, broken cellphones and televisions, used batteries and bulbs, glass bottles and old stoves contribute in some way to environmental pollution.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - September 2017

Read More - Director of Public Prosecutions, Western Cape v Parker 2015 (2) SACR 109 (SCA)
Step-in-Time Supermarket CC*, a registered Value-Added Tax (VAT) vendor (Afrikaans: “ondernemer”), and Mr Parker, its sole representative, were charged in the regional court in Bellville in the Cape Peninsula on a number of counts under the Income Tax Act 58 of 1962 and the Value-Added Tax Act 89 of 1991 (the VAT Act) respectively.
Read More - S V Mandlozi 2015 (2) SACR 258 (FB)
Ms Lindiwe Mandlozi, also known as Leopoldina Maconze (hereinafter referred to as the accused), was convicted before the regional court in Kroonstad in the Free State (the trial court) of contravention of section 5(b) of the Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act 140 of 1992, read together with certain specified provisions thereof.
Read More - S V Mukuyu 2017 (2) SACR 27 (GJ)
Section 51(2)(a)(i) of the Criminal Law Amendment Act 105 of 1997 (“Act 105 of 1997”) provides as follows: “51. Discretionary minimum sentences for certain serious offences
In a publication unrelated to Servamus, Pollex recently remarked as follows as far as Act 60 of 2000 is concerned:

Letters - September 2017

Two former police officers, viz Capt Saravanan Govender and Raju Ellapen, were honoured, appreciated and recognised for the enormous contributions and life-changing experiences they imparted into the lives of thousands of Indian policemen and -women at both the Wentworth and Chatsworth Indian Police Colleges.
The SAPS does not always get a good rap so I would like to commend your members on the dealings we had with them.
The National Council of SPCAs (NSPCA) would like to express our gratitude to members of Ladysmith and QwaQwa SAPS for their assistance with a donkey case recently handled by the NSPCA.
On Saturday 15 July 2017, at around 19:00, I was off duty and took my family to pick up a few things from a café in Swartruggens near the N4, using my private vehicle.
I’m extremely thankful to W/O Van Graan and his two colleagues, W/O Bothma and Sgt Manus from K9 Breede River Worcester, for “saving my life” following an incident on 4 July 2017.
September 2017 Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.