• The reality of prisons for many inmates is far from hoping to be rehabilitated. Instead, the reality is one of trying to protect oneself from the violence perpetrated on the inside. Read our article about the shocking reality of prison violence in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

    The reality of prisons for many inmates is far from hoping to be rehabilitated. Instead, the reality is one of trying to protect oneself from the violence perpetrated on the inside. Read our article about the shocking reality of prison violence in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

  • Some people seem to choose a life of violent crime. We ask whether it is due to an antisocial personality disorder or genes or whether other factors are at play. Read this interesting article in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

    Some people seem to choose a life of violent crime. We ask whether it is due to an antisocial personality disorder or genes or whether other factors are at play. Read this interesting article in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

  • Commercial crime is often regarded as “not so serious”. We prove the opposite in an article featured in the August 2017 issue of Servamus by giving a South African perspective to this very serious crime and the impact it has on the community and economy.

    Commercial crime is often regarded as “not so serious”. We prove the opposite in an article featured in the August 2017 issue of Servamus by giving a South African perspective to this very serious crime and the impact it has on the community and economy.

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- A form of digital sexual harassment?
Compiled by Kotie Geldenhuys

"Can you crawl through my window? I will do whatever you want. I want it to be first-class. First-class hotel, champagne and good sex." These words appeared in a text message sent from the 51-year-old Martin Careen, a teacher at a private Catholic school, to one of his 17-year-old female learners in 2009. More sexually explicit messages followed over a two-day period. Fortunately for this teenager, it had to stop since, in 2012, Martin Careen was sentenced to 60 days' incarceration. He was also no longer permitted to teach (Hopes, 2012). This incident makes one wonder how often teachers, whom we trust with our children, are guilty of this form of abuse.

In the digital age in which we are living, teachers must continually keep up with the latest advances introduced to them by their learners. These advances often pose new challenges in classroom management and learner discipline. Sadly, some teachers misuse developments in technology and get involved in things such as sexting.

Sexting, which is a combination of the words "sex" and "texting" and which means to send lewd messages or pictures via cellphone, has gained prominence in schools in recent years. The NSPCC (Nd) defines sexting as the "exchange of sexual messages or images" and "creating, sharing and forwarding sexually suggestive nude or nearly nude images" through cellphones and the Internet.

Dangers regarding sexting
Cassidy (2016) found that the majority of learners involved in sexting were aged between 13 and 16 years. However, it was found that children as young as seven years old are also involved in sexting. In one incident in the UK, a girl persuaded a boy to take a picture of his genitals and send it to her - she then shared the image with other learners. Teachers have also reported incidents of learners filming themselves masturbating.

Unfortunately, children who get involved in sexting do not know the dangers inherent in their actions. Apart from exposing themselves to bullying, when images are shared, it could make them targets for sex offenders. Furthermore, it can have a significant impact on a learner's emotional well-being and sometimes the impact could be absolutely devastating. The effects could include the following:

  • self-harm;
  • low school attendance;
  • disengagement from learning; and
  • suicidal thoughts and even suicide attempts.

The case of Jessica Logan is a tragic example. She and some of her friends took nude photos of themselves while on spring break in 2008 and she chose to send hers to her boyfriend at the time. He promptly forwarded the photo to someone else, and it spread throughout her school. This led to frequent and persistent sexual harassment from her peers and she started skipping school. Jessica managed to graduate in the face of this social humiliation, but the scars ran deep. A month after her graduation, after attending a visitation for a friend who had committed suicide, Jessica Logan hanged herself in her room (Meyer, 2009). (Also refer to the shocking story of Audrie Pott who committed suicide after being the subject of sexting in Servamus: June 2017.)

Why do young people engage in sexting?
Griffin (2014) argues that there are numerous reasons why young people get involved in sexting.
Some are succumbing to pressure from a boyfriend/girlfriend or do it as a means of demonstrating commitment in a relationship - it can be viewed as a "relationship currency".

  • Some are imitating famous people whom they may follow on social media, such as Twitter or Instagram.
  • Some are merely showing off or trying to get attention (eg "selfies").
  • Some are enticing someone or flirting.
  • In some cases, the teen is being groomed by an adult.

Teaching and protecting children
Digital sexual harassment is a serious threat to teens and teachers should take the lead in addressing this issue. Hepburn (2016) argues that children should be taught about the dangers of sexting from an early age, while Espinoza (2016) adds that children as young as five years old should be taught about these dangers and be encouraged to discuss issues such as respect for their bodies.

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[This is only an extract of an article published in Servamus: June 2017. The rest of this article looks at teachers who are the perpetrators, but also what happens when teachers are the victims. Contact Servamus’s offices to request the rest of the article by sending an e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by phoning (012) 345 4660/22.]

Servamus - August 2017

Asanda Baninzi and Wox Mthuthuzeli Nombewu hijacked a sergeant based at the Langebaan Airforce Base and his girlfriend, then drove them to the Mawumawu area in Nyanga.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
Who will be the next National Commissioner of the SAPS? That is the question on many concerned South Africans' lips - especially those of police members, researchers and the SAPS's partners in the fight against crime.
By Annalise Kempen
Normal, healthy people seldom dream about death. They do not see crime scenes and dead people when they close their eyes.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
For a period of 11 years the serial rapist and murderer, Jimmy Maketta, terrorised communities in the Philippi area near Cape Town.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - August 2017

Read More - S v Parkins 2017 (1) SACR 235 (WCC)
Bradley Parkins (“the accused”) was convicted in the regional court sitting at Wynberg in the Cape Peninsula (“the trial court”) on the following six charges:
Read More - S v Mabitle 2017 (1) SACR 325 (NWM) and S v Monye and Another 2017 (1) SACR 329 (SCA)
In Ask Pollex in Servamus: August 2015, Pollex referred to a number of reported cases in respect of “contract killings”.
Read More In Servamus: June 2017, Pollex discussed the case of S v Hewitt 2017 (1) SACR 309 (SCA) (“the Hewitt case”). (The case involved the retired, world-renowned champion tennis player and instructor, Bob Hewitt.)
The Hewitt case was about three female complainants of whom two were raped and one was sexually assaulted (this offence was known as indecent assault at the time).
This month sees the last of our series of unlawful arrest and detention cases.

Letters - August 2017

Read More - An update (Servamus: December 2016
The telephone rings sharply in the charge office of Kliptown Police Station. The sergeant on duty looks up at the old clock hanging above the fireplace.
From 13 to 16 June 2017, members of the South African Police Service embarked on a trip to Mossel Bay for the Inter Provincial Soccer Championship, which was held at the D'Almeida sports ground.
Fathers’ Day was celebrated this year on 18 June, and I decided to run a special project under Social Crime Prevention for the fathers at Westville SAPS, with the wonderful support of some very gracious sponsors.
August 2017 Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.