• The reality of prisons for many inmates is far from hoping to be rehabilitated. Instead, the reality is one of trying to protect oneself from the violence perpetrated on the inside. Read our article about the shocking reality of prison violence in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

    The reality of prisons for many inmates is far from hoping to be rehabilitated. Instead, the reality is one of trying to protect oneself from the violence perpetrated on the inside. Read our article about the shocking reality of prison violence in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

  • Some people seem to choose a life of violent crime. We ask whether it is due to an antisocial personality disorder or genes or whether other factors are at play. Read this interesting article in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

    Some people seem to choose a life of violent crime. We ask whether it is due to an antisocial personality disorder or genes or whether other factors are at play. Read this interesting article in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

  • Commercial crime is often regarded as “not so serious”. We prove the opposite in an article featured in the August 2017 issue of Servamus by giving a South African perspective to this very serious crime and the impact it has on the community and economy.

    Commercial crime is often regarded as “not so serious”. We prove the opposite in an article featured in the August 2017 issue of Servamus by giving a South African perspective to this very serious crime and the impact it has on the community and economy.

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Compiled by Kotie Geldenhuys

Over the Easter weekend of 2017 the world was shocked when a video was uploaded to Facebook, showing the 74-year-old Robert Godwin being gunned down by a stranger on 16 April 2017 in the US city of Cleveland. In the video, the suspect, Steve Stephens, boasted that he had killed more than a dozen other victims, but police have not yet been able to link him to any other victims or incidents. The police searched for Stephens, but on 18 April 2017 he committed suicide by shooting himself after a worker at a drive through fast food outlet recognised him and alerted police. The question that has been asked ever since is whether the Stephens incident is an example of a "snuff film" or whether Stephens was simply recording a murder.

Child trafficking in the spotlight

By Kotie Geldenhuys

Abby, a 14-year-old girl from a poor family, was walking in the street when a man approached her and told her that she is beautiful. He said that he could open doors for her to become a world famous model who will earn lots of money which will enable her to support her family. She was flattered and, with a promise of a better life, she accompanied him. He promised her a well-paying job in a big city and said that he would take care of all her documentation. Before she knew what was happening, she was in another city. But instead of modelling, she was being held captive, facing daily abuse at the hands of her trafficker. She was drugged and forced into prostitution. Nothing came of the promise of becoming a world famous model earning huge amounts of money. Abby's story is not unique - she is one of thousands of children worldwide who end up in a hell of drugs and prostitution as victims of one of the world's most evil and shameful crimes: human trafficking.

By Kotie Geldenhuys

Child pornography has found a welcoming home on the Internet, as it provides a place for individuals to create, access and share child sexual abuse images worldwide at the click of a button. These criminals prefer to use the Internet since they can go about their illegal business anonymously and privately. They can also be directed to others in an inexpensive way, such as through websites, e-mail, chat rooms, newsgroups, bulletin boards, peer-to-peer networks and social networking sites. Then there is also the potential of real-time and interactive experiences for which webcams, video chat rooms and social networking sites are utilised.

Offenders can connect on Internet forums and networks to share their interests, desires and experiences in abusing children, in addition to selling, sharing and trading images. The child pornography market exploded after the advent of the Internet and is one of the fastest growing online markets. DeGarmo (2017) argues that it is a multi-billion dollar online industry, with more than 100 000 sites dedicated to the crime. The Internet has enabled child pornography to grow as an industry, and it is used as a tool to escalate this already disturbing crime.

- Will the bullying ever stop? Can we bullyproof our children?

Compiled by Annalise Kempen

Social media has made a huge contribution to creating awareness of bullying - not only physical or verbal bullying, but also cyberbullying. The reality is that every single person is a potential victim. It is no longer only the girl with the pimples or the overweight boy who are teased, bullied and left out of activities.

To confirm the point, let's look at what happened at a well-known Johannesburg high school after a video of an assault was posted online in February 2017. In the video, two boys are being shown standing nervously next to each other as two other pupils prepare for the assault. One of the older boys, who is in Gr 11, is shown carefully taking off his blazer and rolling up his shirt sleeves. He then proceeds to slap one of the younger boys hard on the ear. The other bully, also a Gr 11 learner, does the same to the second victim. The two younger boys, who are in Gr 10, stumble backwards but do not fight back.

Servamus - August 2017

Asanda Baninzi and Wox Mthuthuzeli Nombewu hijacked a sergeant based at the Langebaan Airforce Base and his girlfriend, then drove them to the Mawumawu area in Nyanga.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
Who will be the next National Commissioner of the SAPS? That is the question on many concerned South Africans' lips - especially those of police members, researchers and the SAPS's partners in the fight against crime.
By Annalise Kempen
Normal, healthy people seldom dream about death. They do not see crime scenes and dead people when they close their eyes.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
For a period of 11 years the serial rapist and murderer, Jimmy Maketta, terrorised communities in the Philippi area near Cape Town.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - August 2017

Read More - S v Parkins 2017 (1) SACR 235 (WCC)
Bradley Parkins (“the accused”) was convicted in the regional court sitting at Wynberg in the Cape Peninsula (“the trial court”) on the following six charges:
Read More - S v Mabitle 2017 (1) SACR 325 (NWM) and S v Monye and Another 2017 (1) SACR 329 (SCA)
In Ask Pollex in Servamus: August 2015, Pollex referred to a number of reported cases in respect of “contract killings”.
Read More In Servamus: June 2017, Pollex discussed the case of S v Hewitt 2017 (1) SACR 309 (SCA) (“the Hewitt case”). (The case involved the retired, world-renowned champion tennis player and instructor, Bob Hewitt.)
The Hewitt case was about three female complainants of whom two were raped and one was sexually assaulted (this offence was known as indecent assault at the time).
This month sees the last of our series of unlawful arrest and detention cases.

Letters - August 2017

Read More - An update (Servamus: December 2016
The telephone rings sharply in the charge office of Kliptown Police Station. The sergeant on duty looks up at the old clock hanging above the fireplace.
From 13 to 16 June 2017, members of the South African Police Service embarked on a trip to Mossel Bay for the Inter Provincial Soccer Championship, which was held at the D'Almeida sports ground.
Fathers’ Day was celebrated this year on 18 June, and I decided to run a special project under Social Crime Prevention for the fathers at Westville SAPS, with the wonderful support of some very gracious sponsors.
August 2017 Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.