• The reality of prisons for many inmates is far from hoping to be rehabilitated. Instead, the reality is one of trying to protect oneself from the violence perpetrated on the inside. Read our article about the shocking reality of prison violence in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

    The reality of prisons for many inmates is far from hoping to be rehabilitated. Instead, the reality is one of trying to protect oneself from the violence perpetrated on the inside. Read our article about the shocking reality of prison violence in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

  • Some people seem to choose a life of violent crime. We ask whether it is due to an antisocial personality disorder or genes or whether other factors are at play. Read this interesting article in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

    Some people seem to choose a life of violent crime. We ask whether it is due to an antisocial personality disorder or genes or whether other factors are at play. Read this interesting article in the August 2017 issue of Servamus.

  • Commercial crime is often regarded as “not so serious”. We prove the opposite in an article featured in the August 2017 issue of Servamus by giving a South African perspective to this very serious crime and the impact it has on the community and economy.

    Commercial crime is often regarded as “not so serious”. We prove the opposite in an article featured in the August 2017 issue of Servamus by giving a South African perspective to this very serious crime and the impact it has on the community and economy.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3

- Will the bullying ever stop? Can we bullyproof our children?

Compiled by Annalise Kempen

Social media has made a huge contribution to creating awareness of bullying - not only physical or verbal bullying, but also cyberbullying. The reality is that every single person is a potential victim. It is no longer only the girl with the pimples or the overweight boy who are teased, bullied and left out of activities.

To confirm the point, let's look at what happened at a well-known Johannesburg high school after a video of an assault was posted online in February 2017. In the video, two boys are being shown standing nervously next to each other as two other pupils prepare for the assault. One of the older boys, who is in Gr 11, is shown carefully taking off his blazer and rolling up his shirt sleeves. He then proceeds to slap one of the younger boys hard on the ear. The other bully, also a Gr 11 learner, does the same to the second victim. The two younger boys, who are in Gr 10, stumble backwards but do not fight back.

What is bullying?

What happened at this high school is unfortunately not an isolated incident and can be described as bullying, or what the Department of Basic Education describes as "school bullying". This is the type of bullying that occurs either inside or outside of school. It can be physical, verbal or emotional and is usually repeated over a period of time. The Gauteng Department of Education elaborates by noting that bullying can be defined as a deliberate act of aggression or manipulation which occurs when repeated, systematic and hurtful verbal abuse or behaviour are committed by one person on another. The English Oxford Living Dictionaries defines a bully as "a person who uses strength or influence to harm or intimidate those who are weaker" and when one uses it as a verb, it means "to use superior strength or influence to intimidate (someone), typically to force them to do something".

In a school context, bullying occurs in nearly any place in or around the school building. However, it occurs more often during school breaks, in hallways or bathrooms, on school buses and places where children are waiting for buses, in classes that require group work and/or during after school activities. It can happen without the victim doing anything to provoke the behaviour from the bully and takes the form of one learner or a group taking advantage of, or isolating, one other learner or two other learners in particular.

Types of bullying
Bullying is not limited to one type and consists of:

  • Physical bullying

This type of bullying includes acts that are physical in nature, such as when the bully forces other children to do things they do not want to do, takes or damages other children's belongings, engages in violent acts such as kicking, hitting or punching, or even sexually harassing another child such as by pulling the victim's pants down.

  • Verbal bullying

This type of bullying happens when the bully makes verbal threats to the victim or when the victim is teased, mocked or taunted. Other forms of verbal bullying include making threatening and embarrassing gestures; writing nasty letters about someone; insulting a person's family members; calling people names; and swearing.

  • Psychological bullying

This is a type of bullying which is often not recognised or associated with bullying per se and includes the spreading of false and hurtful rumours; excluding someone from activities or groups; telling others to stop liking a specific person; trying to dominate a person; intimidating someone by staring at him/her; humiliating or making a fool out of a person; or scaring or intimidating someone.

  • Cyberbullying

In recent years, and especially with the use of social media becoming more general, victims are being tormented, threatened, harassed, humiliated, embarrassed or otherwise targeted by other children using interactive and digital technologies such as the Internet or cellphones. This form of bullying is also usually not a one-time occurrence, but extends over a period of time.

Warning signs
Parents and teachers are not always sure about whether what they see happening to children can be defined as bullying. There are, however, various signs which adults can look out for and which may help them understand the problems that children are facing at school.

...............

[This is only an extract of the article published in the May 2017 issue of Servamus. The rest of the article continues with a discussion about the warning signs. We also give tips on what parents and schools and the victim can do regarding bullying. We also discuss cyberbullying and again give tips on what parents can do. This article is a must-read for everyone who has children or work with children. If you are interested in reading the rest of the article, contact Servamus’s offices at tel: (012) 345 4660/22 or send an e-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.]

Servamus - August 2017

Asanda Baninzi and Wox Mthuthuzeli Nombewu hijacked a sergeant based at the Langebaan Airforce Base and his girlfriend, then drove them to the Mawumawu area in Nyanga.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
Who will be the next National Commissioner of the SAPS? That is the question on many concerned South Africans' lips - especially those of police members, researchers and the SAPS's partners in the fight against crime.
By Annalise Kempen
Normal, healthy people seldom dream about death. They do not see crime scenes and dead people when they close their eyes.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
For a period of 11 years the serial rapist and murderer, Jimmy Maketta, terrorised communities in the Philippi area near Cape Town.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - August 2017

Read More - S v Parkins 2017 (1) SACR 235 (WCC)
Bradley Parkins (“the accused”) was convicted in the regional court sitting at Wynberg in the Cape Peninsula (“the trial court”) on the following six charges:
Read More - S v Mabitle 2017 (1) SACR 325 (NWM) and S v Monye and Another 2017 (1) SACR 329 (SCA)
In Ask Pollex in Servamus: August 2015, Pollex referred to a number of reported cases in respect of “contract killings”.
Read More In Servamus: June 2017, Pollex discussed the case of S v Hewitt 2017 (1) SACR 309 (SCA) (“the Hewitt case”). (The case involved the retired, world-renowned champion tennis player and instructor, Bob Hewitt.)
The Hewitt case was about three female complainants of whom two were raped and one was sexually assaulted (this offence was known as indecent assault at the time).
This month sees the last of our series of unlawful arrest and detention cases.

Letters - August 2017

Read More - An update (Servamus: December 2016
The telephone rings sharply in the charge office of Kliptown Police Station. The sergeant on duty looks up at the old clock hanging above the fireplace.
From 13 to 16 June 2017, members of the South African Police Service embarked on a trip to Mossel Bay for the Inter Provincial Soccer Championship, which was held at the D'Almeida sports ground.
Fathers’ Day was celebrated this year on 18 June, and I decided to run a special project under Social Crime Prevention for the fathers at Westville SAPS, with the wonderful support of some very gracious sponsors.
August 2017 Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.