• Bullying is a serious issue in schools. We remind about the relevant legislation and definitions in the first of three articles about dealing with school bullies. Read this article in the December 2017 issue of Servamus.

    Bullying is a serious issue in schools. We remind about the relevant legislation and definitions in the first of three articles about dealing with school bullies. Read this article in the December 2017 issue of Servamus.

  • The SAPS is adamant that they want to deal with police members who lead double lives and are susceptible to corrupt activities. All SAPS employees should read this article in the December 2017 issue of Servamus about what it being done to root out corruption.

    The SAPS is adamant that they want to deal with police members who lead double lives and are susceptible to corrupt activities. All SAPS employees should read this article in the December 2017 issue of Servamus about what it being done to root out corruption.

  • Are you a sucker for #FakeNews? We share valuable tips how to distinguish between the good, the bad and the ugly in the December 2017 issue of Servamus.

    Are you a sucker for #FakeNews? We share valuable tips how to distinguish between the good, the bad and the ugly in the December 2017 issue of Servamus.

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By Kotie Geldenhuys

Elephants are hunted for their ivory and rhinos for their horns. Pangolins, lions and leopards are killed for the muti trade. Cycads are removed from the veld and replanted in the gardens of wealthy home owners. Trees are cut down and fish sources are exploited. All over the world environmental crime is a serious problem which, in the past, seldom got the attention it deserves.

Fortunately, environmental crime has in recent years been receiving global attention due to its serious and damaging impact on the environment and ecosystems, as well as on peace, security and development. Environmental crimes, including the illegal mining of gold, diamonds, illegal unreported and unregulated fishing and trafficking in hazardous waste also undermine legal commerce and rob developing countries of an estimated $91 to $259 billion every year. Tax revenue from these activities could have been used to build schools, invest in infrastructure, provide health care and develop business (Nelleman et al, 2016).

The term “environmental crime” encompasses the illegal trade in wildlife, as well as forestry and fishery crimes, illegal dumping of waste including chemicals, the smuggling of ozone-depleting substances and illegal mining. Nelleman et al (2014) state that transnational organised environmental crime involves primarily five key areas:
Illegal logging and deforestation: these activities have an estimated worth of between $30 and $100 billion annually, or 10 to 30% of the total global timber trade. An estimated 50 to 90% of the timber in some individual tropical countries is suspected to come from illegal sources or has been logged illegally (www.unep.org/newscentre/illegal-trade-wildlife-and-timber-products-finances-criminal-and-militia-groups-threatening-security).

  • Illegal fisheries: the haul from illegal fishing is estimated to be worth more than $23 billion annually (Hill, 2016).
  • Illegal mining and trade in minerals, including conflict diamonds.
  • Illegal dumping of and trade in hazardous and toxic waste.
  • Illegal trade in and poaching of wildlife and plants which is estimated to be worth between $70 and $213 billion a year (www.poachingfacts.com).

Environmental impact
Environmental crime has a negative impact on ecosystems and the environment as a whole. Illegal mining, for example, is not limited to the illegal extraction of resources; it also has a severe environmental impact, whether from mercury pollution from artisanal gold mining (Nelleman et al, 2016) or the destruction of natural flora and fauna and the changing of landscapes due to illegal mining.

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[This is only an extract of an article published on pp 10-12 in Servamus: September 2017. The rest of this article looks at, among others, the financial crime links; how criminality and terrorism are financed and how the lack of legislation and law enforcement contribute to organised transnational environmental crime. Contact Servamus’s offices to request the rest of this interesting article by sending an e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by phoning (012) 345 4660/22.]

Servamus - December 2017

A Free State farmer responded to an OLX advert from someone selling animal feed. "I wanted to buy cattle feed, so I deposited the R21 000 immediately after I verified the seller's banking details," he said.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
During mid-October 2017, social media was awash with the news that approximately 30 million South Africans' personal information had been hacked.
By Annalise Kempen
There is no positive light in which to paint the latest crime statistics released by the Minister of Police, Fikile Mbalula, on 24 October 2017.
By Annalise Kempen
Ben is a 14-year-old teenage boy who comes across the online game the Blue Whale. While playing this game, he has to complete one challenge after another.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - December 2017

Years ago, when General Motors “was still a sergeant”, the police’s motto was “Servamus et Servimus”, meaning “we protect and we serve”.
Read More - S V Phillips 2017 (1) SACR 373 (SCA)
Background Section 4(1) of the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act 12 of 2004 (hereinafter referred to as Act 12 of 2004) provides as follows:
Read More - S V Setlholo 2017 (1) SACR 544 (NCK)
In this case the accused was, at the time of committing the two offences concerned, a constable in the SAPS.

Letters - December 2017

While participating in the SAPS National Half-marathon held in Rustenburg during October 2017, I decided that I wanted to run all the marathon races in the Bay during 2018.
On Wednesday 1 November 2017, at approximately 10:00, Capt B R Simpson and Const T E Ntuli from the FLASH Unit at SAPS Emanguzi were travelling along the R22 main road (Engozeni area) towards the Farazela Port of Entry at the Mozambican border.
South African communities are faced with various crimes and it has been a challenge to every citizen to play a role in bringing all perpetrators to justice by working hand-in-hand with the South African Police Service.
Members of the social crime prevention office of Emanguzi SAPS have been working hard to bring awareness to the local communities in an effort to protect the most vulnerable and youngest members in our communities.
December 2017 Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.