• The lockdown has brought along increased policing which unfortunately led to some police and army members taking the law in their own hands by acting violently towards the public. Read our article published in Servamus: February 2021 dealing with this violence.

  • Food fraud is seldom talked about, but a crime that affects rich and poor and can be deadly. The horse meat scandal from 2013 – that was one example. Read the article published in Servamus: February 2021, to learn what food fraud entails.

  • Although many South Africans experienced hard lockdown as having to stay home and limit social exposure, it was a much different game for sex workers. They had to deal with unique challenges during the lockdown and we explore what they did in an article published in Servamus: February 2021..

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By Kotie Geldenhuys

The term "organised crime" is associated with crimes involving "big money": cash-in-transit robberies, smuggling of precious metals and stones, smuggling of wildlife and animal parts, drug trafficking, cross-border vehicle crime and money laundering, to name a few. In the process we overlook the potential role of organised crime in the retail environment. Organised crime in the retail environment is about much more than an armed robbery at a shopping mall when a group of heavily armed criminals target shops trading in goods such as jewellery, IT equipment, cellphones and exclusive clothing. It also involves the large-scale theft of everyday consumer items such as baby formula, cigarettes, razors, over-the-counter medication, health and beauty items, designer brand clothing, accessories as well as electronics.

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By Kotie Geldenhuys

The concept of organised crime often evokes images of mafia- like figures and secret societies involved in drug trafficking and murder. Globally, this “mafia mystique” is associated with shadowy organisations such as the Chinese triads or Japanese yakuza. However, in South Africa, organised crime makes one think about notorious individuals like Radovan Krejcir, Nafiz Modack and Mark Lifman. These crime bosses have been linked to illicit enterprises, with a group of carefully selected organised crime members and corrupt public officials, law enforcement officers and politicians.

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By Prof André Buys

The use of excessive force by law enforcers across the world is not uncommon. In South Africa, the Marikana incident during which 34 miners died at the hands of members of the South African Police Service in August 2012, to this day, raises more questions than answers about the use of force by the police. In the USA, police violence is one of the leading causes of death among young men, with one in every 1000 black men who can be expected to be killed by the police. And their risk of being killed peaks between the ages of 20 and 35 years (Edwards, Lee and Esposito, 2019). According to the Independent Police Investigative Directorate, death in custody has increased for the first six months of the 2020/2021 report year, where 205 people have died as a result of police action, of whom 115 died in police custody (RSG, 2020).

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By Kotie Geldenhuys

Since the Czech fugitive, Radovan Krejcir, entered South Africa with a false passport in 2007, the bodies of people associated with him have been piling up. In May 2010, Lolly Jackson was gunned down in a house in Johannesburg. He and the Czech citizenwere allegedly involved in a R9 million money laundering scheme. Eight days after Lolly Jackson had given Krejcir R2 million and shortly after he was approached to give evidence against Krejcir in a money laundering investigation, he was shot dead (Mail & Guardian, 2011).

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Servamus - February 2021

COVID-19 affects almost every facet of people’s lives and nobody has been left untouched.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
COVID-19 does not only impact on society and the economy, but it also impacts and shapes organised crime and illicit markets.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
The current worldwide COVID-19 pandemic which resulted in various lockdown levels across the world, has opened new opportunities for criminals to exploit people - especially in cyberspace.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
“Bravery is not the absence of fear, but action in the face of fear” - Mark Messier.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - February 2021

Introduction Amendments to the Private Security Industry Regulations, 2002 as published in Government Gazette No 23120 dated 14 February 2002 (“the 2002 Regulations”) are published on p966 to p985 of Part 8 of Government Gazette No 43495 dated 3 July 2020.
Read More - S v Lungisa (696/2019) [2020] ZASCA 99 (9 September 2020) (SCA)
Mr Andile Lungisa, the accused, was convicted on 17 April 2018 before the magistrate’s court, Port Elizabeth (“the trial court”) on a charge of assault with intent to cause grievous bodily harm.

Letters - February 2021

Capson Phuti Kabe was born on 12 August 1960. He was a disciplinarian, a witty public speaker and a seasoned speech writer
Background In Ask Pollex of Servamus: January 2021, Pollex referred to an article that was published in Maroela Media relating to police stations’ areas of jurisdiction.
February Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.