• Does your child have unlimited access to the Internet and apps on their phones? If you have not considered online dangers and health risks for your child, you have to read the article published in Servamus: June 2021.

  • Children as young as 12 years start to experiment with drugs. Make sure that you read the article published in Servamus: June 2021 to learn what parents can do if they expect that their child is using drugs.

  • During divorce battles one parent often alienates the other from having a relationship with their children. In Servamus: June 2021 we discuss this form of emotional abuse of parents and children.

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By Kotie Geldenhuys

They are all over our roads, they stop wherever they want to, ignore red traffic lights and are motorists’ worst nightmare. Drivers of minibus taxis are often described as being unlawful, aggressive and dangerous drivers. And yet, millions of South African commuters often have no choice but to put their lives in the hands of these taxi drivers each day.

For decades the minibus taxi industry, which is a multi-billion rand business, has been the preferred method of transportation for millions of South African commuters daily. Way back in 1999 it was stated that the taxi industry provides transportation for between five and ten million people every day and that it had a daily turnover of R15 million (Weekly Mail & Guardian, 1999). By 2020, the minibus taxi industry was responsible for 75% of all daily transport with approximately 15 million commuter trips daily to work, schools and universities, to access healthcare, shopping or for leisure. Exact figures are hard to pin down because the industry is unregulated and operates on a cash basis. It is estimated that the industry generates R90 billion in revenue annually (Fobosi, 2020).

Although using minibus taxis is more expensive than buses and trains, it is used by the majority of commuters, simply because they provide a more efficient service, especially over shorter routes. They are also more widely available, reaching places that the buses and trains do not. Simultaneously, it is also regarded as one of the most unsafe ways of transportation.

When the National Taxi Task Team, which was formed by Mr Mac Maharaj, the Minister of Transport at the time, published its findings in 1996, it noted a doubling of road crashes from 30 000 in 1984 to 60 000 in 1994. The rest of the findings are even more shocking with a tripling in fatalities in 1984 from 330 to 1000 in 1994 and a tripling of serious injuries from 2000 in 1984 to 6000 in 1994. Minor injuries also tripled, from 3500 in 1984 to 10 500 in 1994. A study on fatalities involving minibus taxis in comparison to other vehicles during 1992 to 1998, found that fatality rates for minibus taxi passengers were both higher and escalating, while fatality rates for other vehicles demonstrated a downward trend (Department of Transport, 2020a). In 1998 alone, taxis were involved in 70 000 crashes in which 900 passengers and 1385 drivers were killed (Weekly Mail & Guardian, 1999). In 2018, researchers from the North-West University published a study focusing on road fatalities in South Africa, using data from 2015. They found that minibus taxis contributed to approximately 9% of fatalities, with the researchers estimating that three of the 36 people killed every day on South African roads travel in minibus taxis (BusinessTech, 2018). In 2018, minibus taxis accounted for 19.2% of major crashes, even though they accounted for only 1.6% of the total number of vehicles on the road (Road Traffic Management Cooperation, 2019).

In 1996, the National Taxi Task Team (NTTT) report further that they found that minibus taxis involved in crashes were not compliant with traffic regulations, that these vehicles had significant defects and that there was a general lack of vehicle maintenance. In terms of driver behaviour, the report revealed that typical problems which were noted included speeding, observing limited to no following distances, performing dangerous overtaking not switching on headlights after sunset and lacking seatbelt usage.

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[This is only an extract of an article published in Servamus: April 2021. If you are interested in finding out how you can read the rest of the article which deals with contributing factors to crashes involving minibus taxis; aggressive taxi driver behaviour; speeding; overloading; driver fatigue and fitness; roadworthiness and corruption, send an e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..]

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Servamus - June 2021

Not a day goes by that we do not see or interact with a private security officer - either when we visit a shopping centre, have a security crisis at home or at the office or when a private security officer passes us while patrolling the neighbourhoods in their vehicles.
By Annalise Kempen
Family murder is a heartbreaking topic and one will never understand how parents can commit such acts involving their own children.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
“I am John. My ‘new’ father enjoyed a couple of drinks at night and then started swearing at my mother.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
When the eight-year-old victim of Nicolas Ninow (the so-called Dros rapist) was asked to testify in court, social media users were up in arms about the reason why this young victim had to testify.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - June 2021

Read More - S v Klaas, Case No: CC51/2020, dated 30 November 2020, High Court Grahamstown (ECG)
Mr Wandile Klaas, hereinafter referred to as the accused, was convicted by the High Court in Grahamstown (nowadays called Makhanda) of count 1: housebreaking with intent to commit theft; count 2: rape; and count 3: theft.
A discussion entitled “Before the accused has pleaded to the charge” and/or, “Two men have been taken in for questioning by the police”, was published in Ask Pollex in Servamus: November 2020.
Read More - S v Thabani Luthuli Case no: AR 106/2020 High Court in Pietermaritzburg, KZN (KZP)
Introduction Mr Thabani Luthuli, the accused, was convicted before the regional court in Ixopo in KZN (“the trial court”) of count 1, housebreaking with the intent to rape, and, count 2, rape.

Letters - June 2021

Securing a conviction in a murder case is always a reason to celebrate that justice has been served.
June Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.