• The lockdown has brought along increased policing which unfortunately led to some police and army members taking the law in their own hands by acting violently towards the public. Read our article published in Servamus: February 2021 dealing with this violence.

  • Food fraud is seldom talked about, but a crime that affects rich and poor and can be deadly. The horse meat scandal from 2013 – that was one example. Read the article published in Servamus: February 2021, to learn what food fraud entails.

  • Although many South Africans experienced hard lockdown as having to stay home and limit social exposure, it was a much different game for sex workers. They had to deal with unique challenges during the lockdown and we explore what they did in an article published in Servamus: February 2021..

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Article and photos by Kotie Geldenhuys

“When the whole world pressed the reset button, policing continued. When world economies collapsed, policing continued. When businesses closed down, policing continued. When everyone was locked down in their homes, policing continued. When news of police officers who were arrested for wrongdoing made headlines, policing continued. When statistics of the COVID-19 infections skyrocketed to alarming figures, policing continued ... When the invisible enemy attacked everyone, including police officers armed with bulletproof vests and machine guns, policing continued ...” - Minister of Police, Mr Bheki Cele (SAPS, 2020a).

During their daily duties police officials are exposed to a unique set of challenges. But during the past couple of months, law enforcement agencies faced even more challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic. During pandemics, such as COVID-19, law enforcement agencies are responsible for working with government and public health officials to contain the spread, serve the local community, maintain public order and conduct their normal policing duties.

As police officials are the first to deal with the public when a crime is committed or to enforce the law, they also have to face the threat of violence against them. During the past couple of months, they have been presented with a new invisible threat, namely COVID-19. Although every person runs the risk of being exposed to this virus, law enforcement comprises “inherently close-contact work with strangers and some of the most marginalised people”. Police officials are therefore on the frontlines when dealing with pandemics and enforcing response measures, while they are simultaneously at a greater risk of exposure and infection (Poston, 2020).

Despite the SAPS’s best efforts to keep the virus at bay by getting police officials to wear personal protective equipment (PPE), sanitise their hands, vehicles and work stations and maintain social distancing while enforcing the law, many infections occurred. The Minister of Police, Mr Bheki Cele announced that by 31 December 2020, 21 294 SAPS employees had already been infected with COVID-19, of whom 336 had sadly already lost their lives to the virus (SAPS, 2020b).

One of the first police members who lost his life due to COVID-19 was Capt Andrew Leslie, the acting commander of Middelburg Police Station in the Eastern Cape. According to his wife, who also tested positive, he might have contracted the virus from another police member who was working with him at a roadblock (Dayimani, 2020). His death on 11 May 2020 came as a huge shock and people reacted in various ways while grieving the passing of a great policeman. Some had a lot of questions, while others blamed government for not taking care of their employees. When Servamus shared the news of Capt Leslie’s passing on our Facebook page, Facebook user (a police member) made the following comment: “I blame Government and SAPS Management for not providing us with proper PPE and we are expected to go outside and police adults that don’t want to listen and can’t even control their own children. We have a Minister that is only making a lot of noise and is more concerned about alcohol and kissing.”

The same shock and disbelief were clear when the news broke about the passing of Lt-Col Raymond Monyai, the Station Commander of Boschkop Police Station in Pretoria on 5 July 2020. Police members who knew him well and who worked closely with him were shocked by his passing. One member told Servamus in disbelief just days after his passing, that “we just had a meeting with him last week and today he is gone”.

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[This is an extract of an article published in Servamus: February 2021. If you want to read the rest of this article with the real-life stories of police members who survived COVID-19, but also the impact on them mentally and on service delivery, contact Servamus’s offices by sending an e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Ed.]

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Servamus - February 2021

COVID-19 affects almost every facet of people’s lives and nobody has been left untouched.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
COVID-19 does not only impact on society and the economy, but it also impacts and shapes organised crime and illicit markets.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
The current worldwide COVID-19 pandemic which resulted in various lockdown levels across the world, has opened new opportunities for criminals to exploit people - especially in cyberspace.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
“Bravery is not the absence of fear, but action in the face of fear” - Mark Messier.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - February 2021

Introduction Amendments to the Private Security Industry Regulations, 2002 as published in Government Gazette No 23120 dated 14 February 2002 (“the 2002 Regulations”) are published on p966 to p985 of Part 8 of Government Gazette No 43495 dated 3 July 2020.
Read More - S v Lungisa (696/2019) [2020] ZASCA 99 (9 September 2020) (SCA)
Mr Andile Lungisa, the accused, was convicted on 17 April 2018 before the magistrate’s court, Port Elizabeth (“the trial court”) on a charge of assault with intent to cause grievous bodily harm.

Letters - February 2021

Capson Phuti Kabe was born on 12 August 1960. He was a disciplinarian, a witty public speaker and a seasoned speech writer
Background In Ask Pollex of Servamus: January 2021, Pollex referred to an article that was published in Maroela Media relating to police stations’ areas of jurisdiction.
February Magazine Cover

Servamus' Mission

Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.